Choosing cremation opens a wide variety of opportunities to be remembered in an interesting and unique way. Some prefer to purchase an urn of their choice or to specify a place to be scattered in their cremation plan. But those who prefer a less traditional memorial can choose to have their voice echo through the ages by having their ashes pressed into a vinyl record.

And Vinyly is a United Kingdom-based company that provides planning services for people who choose to immortalize themselves through music, voice, or other sounds. (Please note that the And Vinyly website takes a rather light-hearted approach to the subject of death. Neptune Society does not share in this approach and strives to ensure all individuals’ final wishes are carried out with the utmost dignity and respect.) Loved ones can receive a vinyl record containing the ashes of the deceased and a 24-minute recording of the planner’s choosing. Pet ashes can be used as well, allowing pet owners to remember their loving companions in a whole new way. The starting price is £3,000 (or $4,350 at the current exchange rate) for the basic service and thirty record copies with the option to buy extra services.

Those planning to use the service can use whatever sounds or music they want to include in their record, but it is discouraged to use copyrighted material. Voice recordings are a popular choice for those who wish to create a message for their loved ones to listen to after they’re gone. Musicians can also choose to provide a recording of an original piece to continue with the music theme. Some even choose to not include a recording at all and to simply listen to the crackling and popping of the bumps created by the ashes – a “new voice” for the deceased.

And Vinyly also provides pre-recorded music and sounds to include on the record for an added fee. The tracks vary wildly from classical to electronica and have a variety of lengths and themes. They can even contact a band to help create an original piece of music specifically designed with the deceased in mind.

For those who want to add a visual element to their record, And Vinyly can provide a portrait artist who can create a portrait of the deceased on canvas using paint mixed with the remaining ashes after creating the records. Copies of the portrait can be printed on the record covers, and the portrait can be made from a photo or after a one hour sitting if preplanning.

Small portions of ashes can be used to appeal to those who wish for a traditional burial. Some part of the body would still have to be cremated, however. And Vinyly can also help organize and plan funerals, allowing people to record speeches and messages on their custom record to be played at the funeral.

To take advantage of And Vinyly’s unique service, it is required that part or all of the body is cremated, and Neptune Society can offer quality cremation services at an affordable price. As America’s most trusted cremation provider, we have years of experience providing assistance through the cremation preplanning process and dignified care at the time of need. If you are considering a cremation for yourself or a loved one, please complete the form on this page to receive our free cremation answer booklet and additional information about cremation.


This article is part of our “What To Do With Cremation Ashes” series in which we intend to highlight the lesser known memorialization options available to families who choose cremation. If you or a loved one is considering cremation, we at Neptune Society encourage you to consider carefully your own position on the memorialization and make the choice you believe is right for you and your family. For more articles in this series, please see our article archive.


Published | Category: Cremation Information Articles, What To Do With Cremation Ashes.

Katie Harrington began working with our Web Operations department as an intern, providing content and information for associated websites. She is currently a student at the University of Florida pursuing a double major in English and Computer Science. In her free time, she participates in the University of Florida’s colorguard and writes novels.